Grass Seed

Artist
Barbara Weir
Price
SOLD
Size
1200x1800
Medium
Acrylic on Belgian Linen
Region
Utopia
About

1200x1800

2019

This work depicts the grass which was found at Utopia until the introduction of cattle grazing in the early 20th Century.

The grass is important to the Aboriginal people because it’s seeds were ground up to make flour.

The seeds fell to the ground and were difficult to see, so the aboriginal people would look for the nesting site of a particular ant. This ant would eat the certain part of the seed then discard the rest. The seeds would be found in a pile outside their nests, the women would collect them clean them and grind them into flour, which then would be used to make bread. Due to the availability of ready made bread this practice is no longer common, but the dreaming for the grass seed has been passed to Barbaba from her ancestors and is important to her people

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Palya Proper Fine Art operates in Mparntwe/Alice Springs, the lands of the Arrernte people. We acknowledge them as the traditional custodians and pay our respect to their Elders, past, present and emerging.